Parkin Blog

© Parkin Architects Ltd. | Working Cooperatively with Local Authorities

Working Cooperatively with Local Authorities

“We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.” ~ Winston Churchill

We believe in an integrated approach, working cooperatively with key stakeholders, construction companies and local authorities to ensure all building and user requirements, current and future, are not only reflected in the design but also adhere to all federal, provincial and local building codes and standards. This is achieved through mutual, open communication with local authorities to meet Ontario Building Code (OBC) and other standards established by the Canadian Standards Authority (CSA), or other requirements of authorities who may have jurisdiction over the project.
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© Parkin Architects Ltd. | Using Pretty Pictures to Help Clients Understand Design and Space Requirements

Using Pretty Pictures to Help Clients Understand Design and Space Requirements

By Lynne Wilson Orr, Principal, Parkin Architects Limited

Architects love to draw. We draw detailed plans complete with grid lines, floor elevation references, partition types and room layouts. We draw elevations and detail the bricks, the precast, the windows and the hoohaws (that’s a technical term for ‘architectural gestures’). We understand what these drawings illustrate and we can conceptualize what the space will look like in three dimensions, as that is what we are trained to do and what we spend our professional lives doing. But does everyone else understand what our meticulously detailed drawings represent? Probably not!
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© Parkin Architects Ltd. | Visioning with Clients

Visioning with Clients

By Lynne Wilson Orr, Principal, Parkin Architects Limited

How do we assist clients to see beyond what they currently have as space and re-imagining what it could be? Not just bigger, but actually better. It can be challenging for many healthcare clients to see beyond their current accommodation and understand how the architecture shapes the provision of healthcare. The visioning processes that we employ to assist clients with these paradigm shifts are simple and straightforward, but require considerable up-front work to be effective.
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© Parkin Architects Ltd. | Applying Lean Principles to Reduce Costs and Waste in Design and Build Projects

Applying Lean Principles to Reduce Costs and Waste in Design and Build Projects

Lean is a method for process improvement. The principles are standardized and can be applied to any process – including institutional design.

First developed by Toyota to eliminate waste in its production, lean principles have since been used in various applications from improving quality of outcome and productivity on production lines, to project management, to design and build of complex public projects.

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© Parkin Architects Ltd. | Water Conservation

Water Conservation

By: Brent Whiteley, Vice President, Parkin Architects Limited

Canada is a country rich with the resource of fresh water, so it is no surprise that we are among the highest per capita users of water in the world. The effects of climate change, population growth and increased urbanization will affect this ready supply of fresh water in coming generations and we need to adopt strategies and promote behaviours to control water usage.  As architects we have the opportunity to help affect a positive change through selection of appropriate fixtures, systems, and natural landscaping that seeks to minimize water consumption.
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© Parkin Architects Ltd. | Integrated Design Process (IDP)

Integrated Design Process (IDP)

A multidisciplinary collaboration, which includes key stakeholders and design professionals, from design concept to completion.

Historically, the conventional design and construction process for institutional buildings involved a series of hand-offs from client to architect to builder. This method presents many opportunities for improvement from initial design to project completion. The Integrated Design Process (IDP) breaks down these traditional silos and provides a holistic or “whole building” design approach.
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